Steroid hypopigmentation treatment

Topical corticosteroids such as Cortaid are generally applied to the affected area as a thin film from two to four times daily depending on the severity of the condition. It is not likely that other drugs you take orally or inject will have an effect on topically applied Cortaid. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, Cortaid should be used only when prescribed. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk when applied to the skin. Similar medications pass into breast milk when taken by mouth. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Conditions which augment systemic absorption include the application of the more potent steroids, use over large surface areas, prolonged use, and the addition of occlusive dressings. Therefore, patients receiving a large dose of a potent topical steroid applied to a large surface area or under an occlusive dressing should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression by using the urinary free cortisol and ACTH stimulation tests. If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent steroid.

Steroid hypopigmentation treatment

steroid hypopigmentation treatment

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